Long admits marijuana use, points to flaws in National Football League testing

Chris Long said he used marijuana during his NFL career and thinks it's time for the league to let players use it without penalty

Chris Long said he used marijuana during his NFL career and thinks it's time for the league to let players use it without penalty. More

The NFL announced on Monday that the league and the NFL Players Association have created a committee that "will establish uniform standards for club practices and policies regarding pain management and the use of prescription medication by NFL players as well as conduct research concerning pain management and alternative therapies".

Chris Long, the second overall pick of the St. Louis Rams back in 2008, retired on Saturday.

"I certainly enjoyed my fair share on a regular basis through my career", Long told "Long said".

Now that former Philadelphia Eagles defensive end has officially hung up his cleats for good, he is speaking open and honestly about his marijuana use.

"We should be headed to a place where we allow players to enjoy what I would not even call a drug", Long added. He also won a Super Bowl in 2017 with the Patriots.

Long hinted that many players across the league use marijuana, and that the testing is for the most part easy to beat.

It remains to be seen when or if the National Football League will ever decide to relax its policy on marijuana use, even as more and more states in the USA continue to legalize and regulate its use by citizens on both medical and recreational levels.

"In that month or two that you stop (smoking), you're going to reach for the sleeping pills, you're going to reach for the pain-killers and you're going to reach for the bottle a little bit more". He finished his career with 70 sacks with 333 combined tackles and 15 forced fumbles.

Long makes some very solid points about it being a lot safer than numerous alternatives - like alcohol - that end up getting players in trouble and creating bad headlines for the league. "I hope they go the opposite direction and just kind of realize how arbitrary that one test is".

Still, critics say the league is late to the party, with numerous current and former players vehemently opposing the current ban.

"I think from a standpoint of what's safer for people and the player, certainly people in the spotlight, it is far less harmful than alcohol, it is far less harmful than tobacco, and at various points in the league's history, they have engaged in partnerships on different levels with those respective industries".

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