Donald Trump issues first veto of his presidency over border wall emergency

Trump wants to use the emergency order to divert billions of federal dollars earmarked for defence spending towards the southern border wall

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President Trump on Friday used the first veto of his administration to reject a bipartisan resolution that sought to block his declaration of a national emergency at the border, a move nearly certain to kill the measure.

Before the Senate voted on terminating Trump's national emergency, he told reporters, "I'll probably have to veto it", and predicted his veto wouldn't be overturned by Congress.

The border wall project still faces a variety of legal challenges, and despite Trump's veto, House and Senate votes against the emergency declaration could carry some weight in the courts. "This is not about the president or border security, in fact I support border security, I support a barrier".

Congress will now need a two-thirds majority in both chambers to override him, which is unlikely to happen.

Trump originally declared a national emergency on the border last month after Congress granted only a fraction of the $5.7 billion he requested for a wall on the border.

Most Republicans who defected did so as a protest vote over the president's methods and their fear about the precedent of executive overreach rather than the underlying debate over whether a border wall is necessary. "This will help stop Crime, Human Trafficking, and Drugs entering our Country", the president tweeted.

The renegade conservatives had condemned the emergency declaration for setting up a risky precedent for a president while emphasising that they still agreed with Mr Trump's tough border security policies.

Trump's reelection campaign began fundraising off the veto early Friday afternoon, sending out an email asking supporters to donate to a "Official Wall Defense Fund".

On 15 February Trump invoked the National Emergencies Act of 1976, claiming there was a crisis on the border that required the construction of walls to protect the United States.

They included Sens. Marco Rubio, Rob Portman, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Pat Toomey, Roy Blunt, Lamar Alexander, Mitt Romney, Rand Paul, Jerry Moran, Mike Lee, and Roger Wicker.

On Friday, Barr also said the president's emergency order was "clearly authorized under the law".

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