Hawking’s final paper on blackholes released

Stephen Hawking's last scientific paper has been released

Stephen Hawking's last scientific paper has been released

Two years later, Perry and Strominger, now aided by Cambridge physicist Sasha Haco, have finished and released the next and final step of Hawking's work on the matter entitled Black Hole Entropy and Soft Hair revealing that that soft hair may allow for the recovery of some information from black hole objects. It has now been written up by his colleagues at Cambridge and Harvard universities and posted online, the Guardian reported on Wednesday.

Almost 60 years later, Hawking argued that black holes also have a temperature and because hot objects lose heat into space, the ultimate fate of a black hole is to evaporate out of existence. According to him, when hot objects exert heat into space, the ultimate fate of a black hole is to evaporate out of existence.

The world lost a great mind when legendary theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking passed away last March.

The revelation led to physicists scrambling for 40 years for a solution to what was referred to as the black-hole information paradox.

In the latest paper, Hawking and his colleagues showed how some of the information may be preserved.

Stephen Hawking's last scientific paper, which he was working on just before he died, could unlock a mystery he grappled with for much of his life.

"This paper proposes a way to understand entropy for astrophysical black holes based on symmetries of the event horizon".

The physicists show that a black hole's entropy may be recorded by photons that surround the black hole's event horizon, the point at which light can not escape the intense gravitational pull.

"It was very hard for Stephen to communicate and I was put on a loudspeaker to explain where we had got to".

If an object is put into a black hole, the hole's temperature is bound to be affected as well as its entropy, a measure of an object's internal disorder. I told him we’d got somewhere.

Among the unknowns that Perry and his colleagues must try to explain are how information "is physically stored in soft hair and how that information comes out of a black hole when it evaporates", says news site Tech2. "He knew the final result", said Perry.

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