Jamal Khashoggi case: sponsors urged to pull out of key Saudi event

Khashoggi case should not be politicized, says UN expert

Report: U.S. Knew of Saudi Plan to Capture WaPo Columnist, Failed to Stop It

Saudi Arabia's top leadership ordered the assassination of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Turkish officials said according to an explosive new report by The New York Times.

If either government seems to be in control of the investigation, Kaye said "it is not going to be seen as credible by significant portions of the global community".

"It's a very serious situation for us and this White House", Trump said.

A group of Republican and Democrat senators united to demand an investigation into the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at a consulate in Turkey.

"I think that would be hurting us", he said.

Hayes offered no evidence to support his wild conspiracy theory, which came in response to the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, "a well-known and well-connected Saudi journalist, self-exiled in the United States, who had for months sounded the alarm over increasingly autocratic moves by the crown prince", the Los Angeles Times reported. "We're probably getting closer than you might think but I have to find out what happened".

When asked about a Post report that USA intelligence intercepts outlined a Saudi plan to detain Khashoggi Trump said "It would be a very sad thing and we will probably know in the very short future".

"We're demanding everything", Trump told reporters.

"Is it possible for there to be no camera systems at the Saudi Arabia consulate, where the event took place?", Erdogan said.

Once Mr. Trump has determined "whether a foreign person is responsible for an extrajudicial killing, torture, or other gross violation of internationally recognized human rights against an individual exercising freedom of expression", according to the letter, he must report to the committee within 120 days with a decision on the imposition of retaliatory sanctions.

Citing US intelligence intercepts of Saudi officials discussing the matter, the American daily - to which Khashoggi contributed as a columnist - reported Wednesday that details of the operation bore the hallmarks of a "rendition".

Turkish officials say they fear Saudi Arabia killed and dismembered Khashoggi, without offering evidence explaining why they believe that.

Khashoggi had written a series of columns for the Washington Post that were critical of Saudi Arabia's assertive Prince Mohammed, who has led a widely publicized drive to reform the conservative Sunni monarchy but has also presided over the arrests of activists and businessmen.

Turkey's Hurriyet newspaper and other media alleged Wednesday that the Saudi Consulate's 28 local staff were given leave on October 2 on grounds that a "diplomats' meeting" would be held there on that day.

The Saudi government has denied any involvement in Mr. Khashoggi's disappearance.

The Saudi ambassador to Washington, Prince Khalid bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, has described the allegations as "malicious leaks and grim rumors" and said the kingdom is "gravely concerned" about Khashoggi. Although his opinions had angered certain people, he said, the tensions between himself and Saudi Arabia did not amount to hate, grudges or threats.

However, they still have to be mindful of the need for Saudi cooperation on US foreign policy goals, including Middle East peace, oil supplies, and missile defense system sales, analysts said.

Turkey says it will conduct a search of the Istanbul consulate, while Saudi Arabia's foreign ministry said the country was "open to co-operation" and a search of the building could go ahead. The administration's Middle East agenda heavily depends on the Saudis, including efforts to counter Iranian influence in the region, fight extremism and build support for an expected plan for peace between Israel and the Palestinians.

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