North Korea gets first big dose of Trump summit news

Ahead of Trump Kim meet US President to hold bilateral meetings with Singapore PM Lee Hsien Loong

US President Donald Trump will hold a meeting with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Monday

Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un were preparing for their historic summit in Singapore as both sides tried to narrow differences before the two leaders come face to face on Tuesday.

At 10am, North Korean vice-minister for foreign affairs, Choi Sun-hee, strode into the Ritz Carlton with her small team.

Prime Minister Lee wished Kim a success for the summit and expressed hope that the US-DPRK meeting will advance the prospects for peace and stability in the Korean peninsula and the larger region.

Tuesday's meeting will be the first between a sitting USA president and a leader of North Korea, whose nuclear and ballistic missile ambitions have raised global concerns and seen tensions soar.

Chairman Kim yesterday held a meeting with Prime Minister Lee.

"The entire world is watching the historic summit between [North Korea] and the United States of America, and thanks to your honest efforts. we were able to complete the preparations for the historic summit", Kim told Lee through an interpreter. The meeting was initially meant to rid North Korea of its nuclear weapons, but the talks have been portrayed by Trump in recent days more as a get-to-know-you session.

Rodman is one of a handful of Westerners to have visited reclusive North Korea and met Kim. Earlier this month, Singapore's defense minister said the USA trade threats were as disruptive to the global order as China's military deployments in the disputed South China Sea. He most recently travelled there a year ago as a private citizen. Trump has also raised the possibility of further summits and an agreement ending the Korean War by replacing the armistice signed in 1953 with a peace treaty.

Trump advisers cast his actions as a show of strength before the Kim meeting.

The fighting ended on July 27, 1953, but the war technically continues today because instead of a difficult-to-negotiate peace treaty, military officers for the US -led United Nations, North Korea and China signed an armistice that halted the fighting.

Rather than bandy the term about, negotiators in Trump's administration should seek to obtain a commitment in writing that North Korea will abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs, Cha continued.

Any nuclear deal will hinge on North Korea's willingness to allow unfettered outside inspections of the country's warheads and nuclear fuel, much of which is likely kept in a vast complex of underground facilities.

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