NCAA new transfer policy: Athletes no longer need permission

NCAA announces transfer redshirt rule changes

NCAA announces transfer, redshirt rule changes

The NCAA announced a significant change to its redshirt and transfer policies for football players on Wednesday.

"This change promotes not only fairness for college athletes, but also their health and well-being", said council chair Blake James, who is the athletic director at Miami.

It will begin this fall, with the 2018 season, wiping away the need for schools to petition the NCAA for a medical redshirt if a player had already played in a game.

"This creates a safe place for student-athletes to have a conversation with their coaches and makes the whole process more transparent", said Nicholas Clark, a Division I student-athlete advisory committee representative. Four games, to be exact.

Under the new rule, athletes would be permitted to be contacted when they notify their current coaches, who have two days to enter the names into a database created and managed by the NCAA that will alert schools who can be recruited.

Under the old transfer model, student-athletes had to receive permission from their current schools to contact a different university before they were allowed to receive a scholarship offer.

However, this could also be a way for coaches to get talented young players on the field while still preserving that fifth year of eligibility, allowing redshirt players to get game experience against "cupcake" teams or potentially play a factor in bowl games.

The previous rule was scrutinized as transferring players were limited in what schools they were able to choose from after being blocked from specific programs.

Beyond this change, the Transfer Working Group is considering other transfer issues, including the processes surrounding postgraduate transfers.

Conferences are still allowed to make rules that are more restrictive than the national rule.

Berry was extremely optimistic about the proposal's chances following the AFCA Convention in January, was less positive in March and cautious in April, when the proposal was tabled over questions about timing, the number of games and potential application to other sports.

In an attempt to prevent schools from tampering with student-athletes already enrolled at another institution, the NCAA has made tampering a Level 2 violation. Previously, college coaches were able to block the transferring athlete from certain schools, and the athlete was required to obtain permission for schools to contact him. If he played in one more game, he would not have been eligible for a medical redshirt.

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