Federal Bureau of Investigation report points to continued rise in American hate crimes

FBI data shows hate crimes appeared to drop in Wisconsin

FBI statistics show hate crimes rise in Minnesota in 2016

The FBI has reported an increase in hate crimes in the U.S. for a second consecutive year, with Hindus and Sikhs among those targeted in the more than 6,000 incidents of crimes motivated by biases towards religions, race, ethnicity and sexual orientation.

Only 18 of those agencies said they investigated hate crimes in the past year.

According to the report, there were 6,063 single-bias incidents involving 7,509 victims of which approximately 59 percent were targeted because on racial, ethnic and/or ancestral bias; 21 percent because of religious bias, 17 percent on sexual orientation bias, 2 percent on gender identity bias, 1 percent on disability bias, and 0.5 percent on gender bias.

The bulk of the crimes in 2016 were motivated by the victim's race or ethnicity. Over half of the religion-related offences were anti-Jewish, while a quarter were anti-Muslim, according to the data.

Over the past year, HRC has been calling on the Trump administration to do more to respond to hate crimes.

A bill that would've introduced a hate crime law in IN died in the legislature on the same day that the Indianapolis Jewish Community Center received a bomb threat.

Minnesota reported 119 hate crimes a year ago, up from 109 in 2015.

Singh said it will be hard for the country to mobilise political will and resources necessary to address the issue if law enforcement agencies fail to document true extent of hate crimes.

Muslims and Jews were the most common targets in the US, with anti-Muslim bias making up the second highest religious bias at 25 percent behind anti-Jewish bias, which accounted for about 55 percent, making Jews the most targeted group in the U.S. "They not only hurt one victim, but they also intimidate and isolate a victim's whole community and weaken the bonds of our society".

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who drew questions during his confirmation hearings about his opposition to a 2009 federal hate crimes law as a senator from Alabama, said Monday that the government should continue to "aggressively prosecute" anyone who violates a person's civil rights. The lack of mandatory reporting means that the Federal Bureau of Investigation data, while helpful, paints a very incomplete picture of hate crimes against LGBTQ Americans. The letter cited examples of hate incidents, including the murder of seven transgender women of color, the February shooting targeting two Indian Hindu Americans in Kansas, and the numerous bomb threats against Jewish organizations and houses of worship, among others.

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