Here's Another Reason to Feel Good About Drinking Coffee

Adding an extra cup a week can decrease the risk of stroke by eight percent and heart failure by seven percent new research from the University of Colorado shows

Just 1 Cup of Coffee a Week May Lower Risk of Stroke & Heart Failure

Researchers used a machine to analyze data from the long-running Framlingham Heart study, which has investigated heart disease for more than 60 years. In this case, they looked for factors that predicted stroke and heart failure risk. Coffee was associated with a reduced risk for heart failure, stroke and coronary heart disease.

Preliminary data indicates that drinking coffee could help reduce heart disease and stroke risk, according to a release.

Because these studies simply observed people's health and coffee consumption over time, the analyses were only able to determine a link between the two-not a cause-and-effect relationship.

The analysis by the University of Colorado was then compared with two other traditional studies to get the overall trend.

Internal medicine resident Dr Lara considered previous studies which show that what people eat can have an impact on atherosclerosis, the narrowing of the arteries that underlies heart attacks, strokes and heart failure.

But in contrast to previous work, the researchers in the new study didn't specifically start out with the hypothesis that coffee lowers the risk of heart failure and stroke.

"The risk assessment tools we now use for predicting whether someone might develop heart disease, particularly heart failure or stroke, are very good but they are not 100 percent accurate", said Laura M. Stevens, B.S., first author of the study and a doctoral student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado and Data Scientist for the Precision Medicine Institute at the American Heart Association in Dallas, Texas. "Our findings suggest that machine learning could help us identify additional factors to improve existing risk assessment models". Further investigation to better determine how red meat consumption affects risk for heart failure and stroke is ongoing.

Senior author Professor David Kao added: "By including coffee in the model, the prediction accuracy increased by four percent".

"The risk assessment tools we now use for predicting whether someone might develop heart disease, particularly heart failure or stroke, are very good but they are not 100 per cent accurate".

Co-author is Carsten Görg, Ph.D.

Presentation location: Population Science Section, Science and Technology Hall.

The study was discussed at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions, where researchers and doctors gathered to learn about the latest heart health advancements. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases.

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