High Court rules in favour of Apple's plan for Athenry data centre

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High Court rules in favour of Apple's plan for Athenry data centre

The Commercial Court has rejected an application to quash planning permission for Apple's new multi-million Euro data centre in Athenry.

Apple in February 2015 announced plans to build the data center in a rural location in the west of Ireland to take advantage of rich green energy sources nearby.

The objectors' main concern was the poor environmental impact assessment carried out by Apple.

Artists impression of proposed data centre.

"This is a very important step for Athenry and for Apple", said Paul Keane, who heads up the Athenry for Apple Facebook page, which has over 4,000 members.

Apple intends to use the data centre to store European user data from services such as iMessage, iTunes and the App store.

The Danish centre will be up and running by the end of the year.

Apple wants to build the data centre in this forest.Business Insider/Sam SheadApple wants to build eight data halls on a 500-acre site in Derrydonnell Forest, which is owned by state-sponsored forestry firm Coillte, and situated roughly three miles from Athenry.

The case will return to the courts on Monday, where it will be decided whether or not a further appeal can be made against Apple.

However, by November previous year, three objectors - local residents Sinéad Fitzpatrick and Allan Daly, and Wicklow landowner Brian McDonagh - received permission to seek a full judicial review of the Apple decision by An Bord Pleanála.

Ireland's worldwide business reputation has been damaged by delays to the Apple data centre in Athenry, according to IBEC.

Planning permission was granted by the local council six months later, but a series of appeals blocked Apple from beginning work.

Up to 2,000 residents marched through Athenry in support of the data centre development back in November 2016. A decision was expected to be made in July, but was delayed until October thanks to a lack of High Court judges.

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