Police seek to jail those responsible for Grenfell fire

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The number of people who died in London's Grenfell Tower fire may be slightly lower than the 80 previously estimated, police said Tuesday, also announcing that individuals may face manslaughter charges over the blaze.

Updating reporters on the investigation, Detective Chief Inspector Matt Bonner said the investigation would deal with "whatever offenses come to light".

It emerged that the force is investigating eight cases in which people may have fraudulently claimed money, as well as four allegations of theft from Grenfell Tower - one involved a "considerable" sum of money.

In July police said they had "reasonable grounds" to suspect that corporate manslaughter had been committed.

Police have identified 336 different organisations with "varying degrees of involvement" as part of the construction, refurbishment and management strands.

'Although police are considering the charges, it will be up to the Crown Prosecution Service to decide if those charges will be taken further to prosecution, which could take longer'.

"The kind of stuff I would envisage we may come across would involve offenses perhaps of fraud, misconduct offenses, health and safety breaches, breaches of fire safety regulations, and of course offenses of manslaughter, whether that be on a corporate or an individual level", Metropolitan Police Commander Stuart Cundy said at the briefing.

Police have formally identified 60 of the victims, but painstaking forensic work to find human remains, some of them tiny fragments, among tonnes of debris inside the charred ruin is ongoing.

The police further said that the number of people who died in the blaze might "come down a little".

But he said there could be people with no social or family connections outside of Grenfell, who have therefore not been identified as missing, whose bodies could still be inside.

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