Facebook to Clamp Down on Who Can Cash in on Ads

Carolyn Everson Facebook 9175

Facebook sales chief Carolyn Everson Michael Seto Business Insider

In a separate post linking to Grudin's, Carolyn Everson, vice president of global marketing solutions, announced the company would provide advertisers more insight into what Facebook content their ads are attached to.

The new standards coincided with an appearance by Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg in Germany, one of Facebook's toughest critics on hate speech and safeguarding privacy.

Marketing executives have criticised Facebook for failing to ensure that the digital ads distributed to its more than 2 billion active users reach their intended audience. On top of this, Facebook is seeking accreditation from the Media Rating Council for Instagram, Facebook and Audience Network.

Advertisers have expressed growing concern that their brands and advertising dollars are being used to bolster objectionable content.

"We take very seriously our responsibility to earn and maintain the trust of our advertiser partners - and give them the confidence they need to invest in us". "That's critical to their success and ours", she wrote.

Among categories of content that could be left outside the ad ecosystem: depictions of death, casualties and physical injuries in tragic situations like disasters; incendiary, inflammatory and disparaging content; and "family entertainment characters engaged in violent, sexualized, or otherwise inappropriate behavior". Facebook faced controversy recently after it was discovered that Russian Federation had used ads on Facebook as part of a disinformation campaign, but the company has been criticized well before that for allowing sensational, false news onto its platform.

Facebook will also step up its monitoring of hate speech, adding 3,000 content reviewers to almost double the size of its existing team, Senior Vice President for Global Marketing Solutions Carolyn Everson said in a blog post.

If your content does not comply with these standards, we will notify you that we have removed the ads. "With a community as large as Facebook, however, zero tolerance can not mean zero occurrence", she said. Its parliament passed a law in June to introduce fines of up to 50 million euros ($60 million) for social media networks if they fail to remove hateful postings promptly.

Altre Notizie